abc dental
abc dental clinic
abc dental clinic
abc dental clinic

Post-Operative Care

pediatric dentist in mission bc
  • If the procedure was in the lower jaw the tongue, teeth, lip and surrounding tissue will be numb or asleep.
  • If the procedure was in the upper jaw the teeth, lip and surrounding tissue will be numb or asleep.
  • Often, children do not understand the effects of local anesthesia, and may chew, scratch, suck, or play with the numb lip, tongue, or cheek. These actions can cause minor irritations or they can be severe enough to cause swelling and abrasions to the tissue.
  • Your child will need to be closely monitored for the rest of the day. The anesthetic can last 2-5 hours. Only liquids. Your child should not be offered anything that requires chewing.
Please do not hesitate to call the office if there are any questions.
Care Of The Mouth After General Anesthesia
  • Please keep the traumatized area as-clean-as possible. A soft wash cloth often works well during healing to aid the process.
  • Watch for darkening of traumatized teeth. This could be an indication of a dying nerve (pulp).
  • If the swelling should re-occur, our office needs to see the patient as-soon-as possible. Ice should be administered during the first 24 hours to keep the swelling to a minimum.
  • Watch for infection (gum boils) in the area of trauma. If infection is noticed – call the office so the patient can be seen as-soon-as possible.
  • Maintain a soft diet for two to three days, or until the child feels comfortable eating normally again.
  • Avoid sweets or foods that are extremely hot or cold.
  • If antibiotics or pain medicines are prescribed, be sure to follow the prescription as directed.
Please do not hesitate to call the office if there are any questions.
Care Of The Mouth After Trauma
  • Do not scratch , chew, suck, or rub the lips, tongue, or cheek while they feel numb or asleep. The child should be watched closely so he/she does not injure his/her lip, tongue, or cheek before the anesthesia wears off.
  • Do not rinse the mouth for several hours.
  • Do not spit excessively.
  • Do not drink through a straw.
  • Keep fingers and tongue away from the extraction area.

Bleeding – Some bleeding is to be expected. If unusual or sustained bleeding occurs, place cotton gauze firmly over the extraction area and bite down or hold in place for fifteen minutes. This can also be accomplished with a tea bag. Repeat if necessary.

  • Maintain a soft diet for a day or two, or until the child feels comfortable eating normally again.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise or physical activity for several hours after the extraction.

Pain – For discomfort use Children’s Tylenol, Advil, or Motrin as directed for the age of the child. If a medicine was prescribed, then follow the directions on the bottle.

Please do not hesitate to call the office if there are any questions.

Please do not hesitate to call the office if there are any questions.
Care Of The Mouth After Extractions
  • Please take your child straight home to rest, relax and recover. Your child must be monitored by an adult for the remainder of the day.

  • Muscle weakness, behavioral changes, tiredness, nausea, dizziness and double vision are common after a sedation. Discomfort and crankiness can be alleviated by giving Children’s Tylenol or Advil. DO NOT USE ASPIRIN.

  • Due to the effects of the sedative on motor skills, plan only quiet activities such as watching a movie, puzzling, coloring, and reading after returning home. Make sure your child avoids going up and down stairs, or playing on anything they could fall from. Closely supervise all activities for the rest of the day.

  • DO NOT allow your child to eat or chew on anything until the freezing is gone. Liquids can and should be given immediately even while the mouth is frozen. Begin with small sips to ensure that your child can keep it down without vomiting. Soft foods are best to start with when freezing wears off.

  • Nausea and vomiting may occur after a sedation. Gravol suppositories work well to control this. If vomiting persists, contact our office or your family doctor.

  • If your child falls asleep, be sure they are sleeping on their side or stomach with head tilted back and chin up. Continue to monitor your child even when they are sleeping.

Please do not hesitate to call the office if there are any questions.

ABC Dental has been serving infants, children and teens in the Fraser Valley since 1998.

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